Singing and Teaching From an Undivided Self

We have more academically-educated singers and voice teachers now than at any time in the history of vocal expression, and dare I say it? Very little teaching from an Undivided Self, which means very little useful and true wisdom.

Learning to get to this place this requires TIME.

It’s a sort of alchemical process to find personal, musical and pedagogical ah ha’s! amid the deafening noise of information, data, and a cult of personality. These things don’t work well with singing. Because singing is about first finding silence of stillness and then becoming a channel for bio-electric energy, all human expression and divine connection.

I think many teachers ‘head’ know this–but they don’t FEEL it or EMBODY it.

There is a crying need for a 1:1 Experiential Learning Program outside of academia to allow teachers and singers the time they need to create this alchemical process. To learn to teach WHO they ARE as well as WHAT they KNOW.

I’ve put together what may be the first program of its kind, “The Alchemy of Teaching Singing,” to fill a hole in the Continuing Education of Singing Teachers.

We’ll work with practical and useful steps towards integrating your singing, passions, pedagogical foundations, teaching interests and needs to create your undivided Self.

I’ll also help you honor every facet of your life experience, which creates a space of immense coherence and strength to hold student, learning, and your Self.

THAT’s where the magic happens.

Special thanks to Palmer Parker and his brilliant book “The Courage to Teach.”

Update on Women, Menopause, Singing

To receive publication updates on the new book “Women Singing Through Menopause, Midlife and Beyond,” please sign up at Studio Bos Media

We are still wooing the right title.

Writing with coauthors Nancy Bos and Joanne Hayes Bozeman has been one of the most rewarding collaborative experiences of a long life spent in collaboration. Combining the voices of three powerhouse artist/educators who are researchers has taken a huge investment of T-I-M-E. But building a solid infrastructure for the book and becoming vulnerable to each other (check out Brene Brown’s The Call to Courage) are birthing our idea into reality.

We are writing a book for Great Aunt Betsy who sings in her church choir, for the college voice professor who has always sung well and then, well, doesn’t. For the community musical theater singer, to the elite classical and popular music singer. For the voice teacher or singer who’s own voice has gotten better and better and may not understand what is happening with others who have a different experience. For the medical community that knows nothing about menopause and voice changes because it is outside of their health model. For the used-to-sing woman who is just fine with how her voice is as she gets older and doesn’t think much about it.

So the challenge has been how to combine our three author-voices, our interviewees’ individual stories AND a curated list of reliable information into one voice–

–to reach all these singers.

It’s happening and we can’t wait to share it with you!

Evidence-Based Vocal Pedagogy and Other Mystifications, Part II

If you haven’t read Part I, head over for a quick read.

My husband is an Instructional Designer. We have long, sexy talks about Andragogy, which is the art and science of teaching Adult Learners. In his field, (and many others) Pedagogy means the art and science of teaching children.

These conversations have got my WHEELS TURNING and I am thinking that “Evidence-Based Vocal Pedagogy,” when working with adult singers, would be enhanced by using a few principles from Evidence-based Adult Learning.

So If you work with adult singers or voice teachers, here’s a short quiz to find out if your teaching might be more effective with a few of these basic principles of Adult Learning. (and maybe you already do this–BRAVA if that is the case.)

I. Adults learn better when the instruction they receive is tailored to their learning styles (e.g, Visual, Aural, and Kinesthetic)

DRAMATIC PAUSE

The answer, according to Evidence-Based Adult Learning is, no. Most of us were taught otherwise. But here are some interesting articles that explain more:

Debunking Learning Myths

The Atlantic “Are Learning Styles” Real?

II. The more you give your students, the more they will learn.

TAKES A SIP OF TEA

Once again, the answer is no. A colleague asked what is meant by “the more you give.” In this case, they are referring to the amount of information or ideas presented in one training session, whether that is one class or 10 classes, or in a private lesson or coaching.

To get how this might apply to both private lessons for adults and courses, here are three sources to jump start your thinking:

Compulsory Teaching, by Dr. Shannon Coates

Shut Up and Let the Student Sing, by Cate Frazier-Neely

Giving Students ‘Think Time

III. Making mistakes is useful for learning

STARES OUT WINDOW AT DAFFODILS

Here, the answer is yes. The enemy of learning, creativity and authentic vocal expression is Perfectionism.

There’s a fine line between expecting a student’s best and demanding perfection.

However, my colleague, Jennifer Cooper, says that in teaching adult singers, making repeated mistakes at the fundamental level (pitches, rhythmic accuracy etc.) can create a reinforcement of inaccuracy (i.e. once that pitch is learned “wrong”, it takes dozens of accurate repetitions to correct it).

And I would add that the educating the ear and physical coordination, to make music, is harder as an adult that it is for a child–just like languages and sports. Making mistakes is only useful for people who do the work of learning from them.

The Secret of Creativity: Make Mistakes

IV. Students who express satisfaction with a training course are more likely to have learned more than students who say they were dissatisfied with the training course.

WATCHES CAT LICKING HIS PRIVATES

This one may surprise you. The answer here is no, too!

Expressing satisfaction with a teacher or training course may not be the same as learning what is being taught by the teacher or in that training program. The five-star, ‘rate your professor’ nonsense that has taken root does not measure anything accurately or well. I have seen amazing teachers given one star because the student thought the homework was too hard, and charismatic teachers given 5 stars because they acted like buddies with their students. Expressing satisfaction, or no satisfaction, has little to do with what has been learned in many cases. To read more:

Alliger, G.M. Tannenbaum, Bennett, Traver, & Shotland (1997) A meta-analysis of the relations among training criteria. Personnel Psychology, 50(2), 341-358

Sitzmann, T, Brown, Casper, Ely and Zimmerman (2008) a review and meta-analysis of the nomological network of trainee reactions, Journal of Applied Psychology, 93, 280-295

Please share your thoughts on this series! I am preparing the infrastructure for a new voice teacher mentoring course and could use your reactions to these posts.