Singing Through Change: Who We are Writing For

If menopause symptoms were due solely to hormonal changes then the menopausal experience would be more homogenous.

In “Singing Through Change: Women’s Voices in Midlife, Menopause and Beyond, Nancy Bos, Joanne Bozeman and I are writing for a wide variety of singers who:

–Have sung all their lives but don’t understand that singing through the lifespan is like being active in sports. You need to tend things along the way or you can’t play.

Don’t know much about their bodies or biological cycles other than what they hear in media or what their doctors tell them.

–Work with singers through midlife and aging: coaches, teachers, performers, choral conductors, music directors and medical personal.

–Are colleagues, students and medical professionals. We are writing the book we wish we’d had as we moved through our changes.

A very T-A-L-L order? Yes.

That’s why there are three of us writing in collaboration. We are really excited about the very unique way of co-authoring we’ve created! It takes longer than if we each write a chapter, but it’ll be worth it!

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Book Titles and Search Engines…

Who knew it would take so long to come up with a title for our upcoming book on Singing and Menopause, to be published by StudioBos Media???

We started out months ago by brain-storming every idea we could think of to see what would stick. We ran titles by some of our interviewees, colleagues and friends and our editor. We had to have certain words in the title for the Search Engine. We didn’t want it to be too academic-y or cartoonish.

“Aunt Flo’s Not in the House Anymore” was the first of the spaghetti thrown against the wall. It didn’t stick. (Evidently people in the midwest “get” that but as an East Coaster I was ‘Huh?’)

Let me know if you don’t get it too….

Today we finally decided on

Singing Through Change: Women’s Voices in Midlife, Menopause, and Beyond

A quote from co-author Joanne Hayes Bozeman:

Through researching and writing this book, I have come to appreciate that the menopausal transition is far more than a set of symptoms attached to a shift in hormones. It’s a unique, sometimes untidy socio-physiological-psychological metamorphosis for women. For singers, the voice is often a crucial part of that metamorphosis.

Sign up for our mailing list and read about the authors here.

Practice while Standing on One Leg

Ian Anderson, lead singer of Jethro Tull

Did you know you can improve your rhythm AND your singing….while balancing on one leg?

Wha?????

To find out some of WHYS and HOWS, watch my guest appearance on Adam Neely’s fantastic Youtube Channel.

Please pardon the bad haircut. My beloved hairdresser is out on maternity leave and, well, you know…

Menopause and Singing: Shifting the Conversation

As some of you know, I am co-authoring a book with Nancy Bos and Joanne Hayes Bozeman on the topic of women singing through midlife biological changes and menopause.

Research has been pretty fascinating and we are digging into areas not usually associated with The Change. (ooooo, suspense!) Our interviews include 52 female singers during 1) various stages of peri-menopause and menopause, 2) a large variety of genres and musical styles 3) many skill levels and cultural experiences.

We are speaking with colleagues and experts in a wide variety of disciplines and will reference many top-notch resources. We are grateful for those who’ve researched and written about hormonal effects on the female singing voice.

But the REAL experts are the women themselves. Their stories, their solutions, their journeys: sometimes easy and breezing on through, some devastatingly difficult.

Statistics are important but their purpose is not to reveal how individual the mid-life journey is for EACH woman. Data can be used to influence public health policy and obtaining grants for important research. Stories save individuals and pass on wisdom not found in data.

Both are needed!

Western medical science & academic learning must become equal partners with honed intuition, and listening to the Wisdom of the Body to create health, wellness and experience singing in new ways.

This is an “angle” of our book. We are writing for singers and teachers who may not have access to the information that has been gathered over the past 30 years. We are also writing for women who are willing to do the work of rebirthing themselves during these years and need extra support.

I’ll report on our progress so join me here for peeks and perks!

Index of my previous articles

Excess Saliva While Singing, Part II: Vocal Master Class #11

Let’s face it, the topic of “saliva and singing” isn’t particularly interesting unless you are a singer who finds yourself needing to swallow after every other word. Or you need to completely stop singing to allow saliva time to move down the esophagus.

Chronic excess saliva while singing can suck the joy out of making music. It makes you feel unreliable and is both anxiety and frustration-producing as well. Which just makes the problem worse. And then you feel worse because you KNOW this.

I’d never thought much about this issue in my 38 years of working with singers and singing teachers. Then, last month, three clients turned up IN THE SAME WEEK, who were dealing with excess saliva and singing. One singer’s issue was solved within one session, but I had to do my research because it was new to me.

I then had to fit that research into my overlying pedagogic principles and the use of personal creativity in the studio. (Read Vocal Pedagogy and Creativity, Parts, I and II, starting HERE.)

Reason #2: Excess Saliva and Singing can be caused by certain mouthwashes, toothpastes and teeth whitening products.

Celia, Singer #2, is in her late 30’s, a professional chorister with a BA in piano. She developed the excess saliva about a year ago. When she came for her first session, as we were speaking I noted that her mouth smelled minty. As it turned out, I had just spoken with my dentist about excess saliva and certain mouthwashes, which sometimes contains saliva-inducing ingredients that are normally used to help people with dry mouth. Obviously, vocal fold health depends upon being hydrated.  I asked Celia about her dental regime and she told me that she regularly uses a mouthwash and fluoride gel-cams.

Da-Ding! I suggested she do her own research on the products she used and discovered that they did contain flavoring agents that are often saliva-inducing. These can include sweeteners such as sorbitol, sucralose, sodium saccharin, and xylitol, all of which stimulate salivary function. Three days after discontinuing use of these products, she noticed much less excess saliva while she sang. We had one more session and she seemed to be happy with her progress and ready to return to her voice teacher.

Jan Potter Reed, a wonderful SLP and Singing Voice Specialist at The Chicago Institute for Voice, suggested elderberry lozenges as a possible remedy for excess saliva, but added that singers have to be in touch with whether or not they dry out the mouth too much and create other issues by drying out the vocal folds.

NOTE: Another cause of excessive swallowing during singing is acid reflux.  Each singer with this condition needs a different management plan and kinds of support.

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Excess Saliva While Singing, Part I, Vocal Masterclass #10

Recently I worked with three singers who experience excessive saliva while they sing. They need to constantly stop to swallow and regroup before resuming phonation. Getting to the bottom of the issue was different for each one! What a puzzle.

In this first of a 2-part “Saliva Series,” I’ll describe one possible reason and my solutions/recommendations solutions for one singer. The next post will be on another reason and possible solution.

“Steven” is a bass with a church job who also sings with an established men’s a cappella ensemble with the name “The Suspicious Cheese Lords.” This organization is paying for each singer to have a private lesson with either Elizabeth Daniels or myself, as we have been their ensemble’s vocal clinicians for the past 7 years. When Steven came in, I asked him to tell me what he wanted to work on and he mentioned the saliva issue, among other things.

We were able to help his excess-saliva-and-need-to-swallow-a-great-deal issue in one session.

Reason #1: Saliva as drainage can be a head/neck alignment issue.

The overlying principles used in our session together were:

Observation, Somatic Empathy, and Using Repeated Slow and Tiny Muscle Movements to Bring Head and Neck into a Freer Dynamic. (Steven cranes his head forward in a rather fixed state, but only while singing.  He described his work environment as aerodynamic, with supportive-seating, computer height, standing desk, etc.)

We then adding the task of holding music, singing small intervals of pitch while on only two vowels, back and forth along the chromatic scale.

We balanced coordination among arms, wrists, hands, and core muscles while holding music, which affects that neck-head freedom. He experienced new sensations around the T-12 vertebrae, especially in ease of breath response and engagement upon phonation.  He voiced that he thought this would reduce anxiety around performance and ensemble rehearsals.

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All this for saliva issues!

What did we “do?”

  1. Somatic Tongue release which takes a full 10 minutes to experience.
  2. Drape over a Pilates ball to experience spinal movement–which changed shoulders from a fixed to a dynamic alignment. (another ten minutes.)
  3. Then “Gorilla Breath” in stages, from draping front first over a large Pilates ball to graduated standing. (based on Alexander Technique and other body-mind work involving limbic response noises.)
  4. Tongue over straw, ai-ai-ai on 1-2-1-2-1, while guiding back to freedom of spine. At the end of all this slow work he reported that he felt freedom and movement in tailbone and pelvic area.
  5. We also worked back and forth between his native language of French and English and the curious minutia around the “a” vowel which was exposed.

All this mind-body work alternated with allowing one or two minutes between activities to process and let the work to “sink in.” I told one or two anecdotal stories to allow him to relax his focus, laugh and regroup.

I suggested that he mark in his scores when to swallow if it became excessive again while he was learning new skills

We finished by Steven singing a page of choral music. No saliva. He realizes that practicing this awareness is important and is not the same as what he normally experiences out of anxiety about the saliva overload. He said, “I feel singing as a connection between my body and my head. And the saliva is greatly reduced.”

It also helped him use the good stuff that his former teacher had taught him!

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A Singer Diagnosed With Benign Essential Tremor, One Case

 

Teresa is a vital voice teacher and singer with a full private voice studio in Pennsylvania. At age 60, she restarted her own voice lessons after not studying singing since college, although she had coached and worked with many  musicians during that time.

Throughout menopause, creativity can bloom and demands new energy outlets. Teresa wanted to earn recognition as a performer of classical and musical theater music in her community and felt she had not been able to do that because of her vocal condition.

Her speaking was absolutely fine, even with teaching for hours. But her singing was characterized by a wobble/shaking of pitch throughout a limited range,  breaks throughout the lower passaggio and great pitch instability. Her body was affected by a hip issue and she walked with a minor limp. She and I talked about healing, spirituality and singing as a foundational attitude for the journey we were about to take together.

We began working with a combination of exercises and approaches informed by voice therapy for Parkinson’s patients and advanced use of Somatic VoiceWork tm: The Lovetri Method as a rehabilitation method.  I also used many Somatic Reeducation* exercises over time to stimulate her respiratory system and core, which had weak function because the muscles of the throat were not functioning well–not the other way around as many teachers and therapists believe. 

It is also effective work to take advantage of the neuroplasticity of the brain. Essential tremor is a central nervous system dysfunction that starts with brain impulses, so slowly groving new patterns in the brain itself is a large key to healing the dysfunction.

I chose not to start with standard SLP rehabilitation tools other than identification of some life style habits to change. She started practicing yoga and renewed her commitment to physical therapy and massage for her hip.

Our hips are the ‘seat’ for the pelvic diaphragm and a source for grounded energy to come through our bodies.

The only SOVT exercises that were helpful were variations on “ung,” closing to the “ng” and sliding 1-3-1 or 1-5-1. She could not slide 1-2-1 without actually staying on the same pitch, so the larger intervals were necessary at first. I did not say “you are flat, sing that second pitch higher,” because she literally could not. It was a functional problem, not a problem with her ear.

Within 6 months she could sing a slurred 5-tone scale without wobble and on pitch, on certain vowels. She began to establish some vocal flexibility. She developed some integrated head voice function that she could use to illustrate while teaching, and students and her conductor encouraged her improvements.  Her soft palate had begun to activate, although it could not stay activated and her body response would shut down. And this is why…

…she received a diagnosis of benign essential tremor after Lovetri noted that she might have an essential tremor. And the interesting thing is, the diagnosis did not change the type of work we were doing, not because I am pig-headed but because it was the most effective work in the first place. However, it did give her enormous peace of mind that she wasn’t doing something “wrong” or was a bad singer.  It was something she could share with students and directors, and let them know that she was aware of and working to improve.

She is contemplating recommended Botox injections. This can be very effective, but the injections wear off and need to be repeated. My belief is that there are deeper levels of healing to be found, which can be supplemented with effective medical therapies. It is her belief, too.

After one year of work based on the Parkinson’s voice therapy and Lovetri’s research, I added some of the exercises for essential tremor found in Leda Scearce’s fantastic  book Manual of Singing Voice Rehabilitation.  It just goes to show how important working with the person in front of you is, and that a set of specific exercises rolled out by rote can not possibly serve each pathology patient who is a singer.

Teresa’s is also an interesting case illustrating that time is needed to allow inner psychological changes of Self when we are older. Teresa thought she was a soprano based on her college self of 40 years ago, and was singing alto in her small church choir due to her limited range. All this time, in spite of not studying, she has been evolving into a possibly true contralto of a substantial size. I would say that from the time I first mentioned this possibility, to fully embracing what her voice is becoming, was almost two and a half years! She has been excited and full of wonder, processing this change in self-identification.

This year, Teresa successfully performed the role of Jack’s Mother in Into the Woods, acted in a  production of Steel Magnolias, has stabilized her alto choral singing and has started to prepare for a community concert, singing Brahms’ Two Songs for Alto, Viola and Piano!

Life isn’t about inventing yourself. It is about releasing yourself. And menopause is the time to do this with courage, humor and tenacious grit. And with a voice teacher/SVRS who takes you seriously and helps you accomplish small goals, one step at a time.

If you found this post helpful, please like, share or comment. Each post takes hours to write, I want to know that others found it valuable! Thank you.

*Two books to help introduce you to somatic reeducation concepts are

Body and Voice by Gilman

Singing With Your Whole Self: The Feldenkreis Method by Nelson and Blades-Zeller