Contemporary Musical Theater Repertoire: Women in Mid to Later Life

There are a large number of ‘mid-to-late life’ female musical theater singers who are singing better than ever as they age. I am sure they work very hard at it. And at the same time, they’ve learned to let go of their younger selves to make room for the warmth, depth and passion the mid to later life years can bring.  Please add your additions to this list in the comments.

If you are a women “of a certain age,” you can sing just about anything if you invest in good arrangements. If an ingenue sings the song in the original musical theater version, you can work with a good arranger or pianist to have something arranged for you that helps to express you today. This does cost money, but then you have an arrangement that is yours to sing in cabaret, auditions and other programs. But we do have a new body of song starting to build up that expresses the many facets and experiences of growing older.

My Most Beautiful Day (Tuck Everlasting)

I haven’t Got a Prayer (Sister Act) Sung by Mother Abbess (starts at about 30′)

Dividing Day and Fable  (Light in the Piazza) sung by Margaret

Close the Door (Anastasia) sung by Dowager Empress

Better Yourself (War Paint) sung by Elizabeth Arden

Now You Know (War Paint) sung by Helena Rubenstein

So Big/So Small (Dear Evan Hanson) sung by Heidi

(Also, listen to Renee Fleming’s latest CD release with an arrangement for her of this song.)

Land of Yesterday (Anastasia)
sung by Countess Lilly

Just One Step (Songs for a New World) sung by Woman 2

Love and Love Alone (The Visit) sung by Claire

Almost and Always Better  (Bridges of Madison County) sung by Francesca

Big, Blonde and Beautiful (Hairspray) sung by Mother Maybelle

Days of Plenty and Here Alone, (Little Women) sung by Marmee (the video quality of these recordings is poor, but it’s the the great Maureen McGovern  singing!


Days and Days (Fun Home) sung by Allison

Another Winter in Summer Town and Will You (Grey Gardens) sung by Edie

And last, but not least, check out the second act songs from the musical John and Jen by Andrew Lippa. Jen has a grown son in the second act.

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Excess Saliva While Singing, Part II: Vocal Master Class #11

Let’s face it, the topic of “saliva and singing” isn’t particularly interesting unless you need to swallow excess saliva after every other word. Or you need to completely stop singing to allow saliva time to move down the esophagus.

Chronic excess saliva while singing can suck the joy out of making music. It makes you feel unreliable and is both anxiety and frustration-producing as well. Which just makes the problem worse. And then you feel worse because you KNOW this.

I’d never thought much about this issue in my 38 years of working with singers and singing teachers. Then, last month, three clients turned up IN THE SAME WEEK, who were dealing with excess saliva and singing. One singer’s issue was solved within one session, but I had to do my research because it was new to me.

I then had to fit that research into my overlying pedagogic principles and the use of personal creativity in the studio. (Read Vocal Pedagogy and Creativity, Parts, I and II, starting HERE.)

Reason #2: Excess Saliva and Singing can be caused by certain mouthwashes, toothpastes and teeth whitening products.

Celia, Singer #2, is in her late 30’s, a professional chorister with a BA in piano. She developed the excess saliva about a year ago. When she came for her first session, as we were speaking I noted that her mouth smelled minty. As it turned out, I had just spoken with my dentist about excess saliva and certain mouthwashes, which sometimes contains saliva-inducing ingredients that are normally used to help people with dry mouth. Obviously, vocal fold health depends upon being hydrated.  I asked Celia about her dental regime and she told me that she regularly uses a mouthwash and fluoride gel-cams.

Da-Ding! She did her own research on the products she used and discovered that they did contain flavoring agents that are often saliva-inducing. These can include sweeteners such as sorbitol, sucralose, sodium saccharin, and xylitol, all of which stimulate salivary function. Three days after discontinuing use of these products, she noticed much less excess saliva while she sang. We had one more session and she seemed to be happy with her progress and ready to return to her voice teacher.

Jan Potter Reed, a wonderful SLP and Singing Voice Specialist at The Chicago Institute for Voice, suggested elderberry lozenges as a possible remedy for excess saliva, but added that singers have to be in touch with whether or not they dry out the mouth too much and create other issues by drying out the vocal folds.

NOTE: Another cause of excessive swallowing during singing is acid reflux.  Each singer with this condition needs a different management plan and kinds of support.

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Excess Saliva While Singing, Part I, Vocal Masterclass #10

Recently I worked with three singers who experience excessive saliva while they sing. They need to constantly stop to swallow and regroup before resuming phonation. Getting to the bottom of the issue was different for each one! What a puzzle.

In this first of a 2-part “Saliva Series,” I’ll describe reason #1 and my solutions/recommendations solutions for one singer. The next post will be on solution #2.

“Steven” is a bass with a church job who also sings with an established men’s a cappella ensemble with the name “The Suspicious Cheese Lords.” This organization is paying for each singer to have a private lesson with either Elizabeth Daniels or myself, as we have been their ensemble’s vocal clinicians for the past 7 years. When Steven came in, I asked him to tell me what he wanted to work on and he mentioned the saliva issue, among other things.

We were able to help his excess-saliva-and-need-to-swallow-a-great-deal issue in one session.

Reason #1: Saliva as drainage can be a head/neck alignment issue.

The overlying principles used in our session together were:

Observation, Somatic Empathy, and Using Repeated Slow and Tiny Muscle Movements to Bring Head and Neck into a Freer Dynamic. (Steven cranes his head forward in a rather fixed state, but only while singing.  He described his work environment as aerodynamic, with supportive-seating, computer height, standing desk, etc.)

We then adding the task of holding music, singing small intervals of pitch while on only two vowels, back and forth along the chromatic scale.

We balanced coordination among arms, wrists, hands, and core muscles while holding music, which affects that neck-head freedom. He experienced new sensations around the T-12 vertebrae, especially in ease of breath response and engagement upon phonation.  He voiced that he thought this would reduce anxiety around performance and ensemble rehearsals.

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All this for saliva issues!

What did we “do?”

  1. Somatic Tongue release which takes a full 10 minutes to experience.
  2. Drape over a Pilates ball to experience spinal movement–which changed shoulders from a fixed to a dynamic alignment. (another ten minutes.)
  3. Then “Gorilla Breath” in stages, from draping front first over a large Pilates ball to graduated standing. (based on Alexander Technique and other body-mind work involving limbic response noises.)
  4. Tongue over straw, ai-ai-ai on 1-2-1-2-1, while guiding back to freedom of spine. At the end of all this slow work he reported that he felt freedom and movement in tailbone and pelvic area.
  5. We also worked back and forth between his native language of French and English and the curious minutia around the “a” vowel which was exposed.

All this mind-body work alternated with allowing one or two minutes between activities to process and let the work to “sink in.” I told one or two anecdotal stories to allow him to relax his focus, laugh and regroup.

I suggested that he mark in his scores when to swallow if it became excessive again while he was learning new skills

We finished by Steven singing a page of choral music. No saliva. He realizes that practicing this awareness is important and is not the same as what he normally experiences out of anxiety about the saliva overload. He said, “I feel singing as a connection between my body and my head. And the saliva is greatly reduced.”

It also helped him use the good stuff that his former teacher had taught him!

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Beliefs That Hinder Singing, Part II: Vocal Master Class #9

Joshua is a 46-year old tenor with a lovely singing voice and a great deal of responsibilities both at work and to his family.  He has three children under the age of 13, a wife managing her chronic medical condition, and he works full-time in a demanding corporate job.  It is amazing to me that he has made time for voice lessons consistently since his wife bought him a few lessons for his 40th birthday, 6 years ago!

Josh studied singing in college, follows written music, and performed in musical theater for many years. At the time we started lessons he was singing in his synagogue choir and occasionally soloing as a lay cantor. He wanted to eventually return to singing musical theater in community productions. He figured if he could keep at it, he wouldn’t be rusty when he retired.

He has a history of severe sinus and throat issues, including terrible allergies and multiple procedures to remove nasal polyps.

Josh has little time or head space to practice. While he enjoys our journeying through  functional vocal development, it took him a very long while to change the way he sang. Progress was slow but I always allowed time at the end of every lesson for him to sing through a song or two, with my accompanying at the piano so he could enjoy music-making.

After about 3 years of consistent bi-weekly lessons, he began to understand that he couldn’t just launch into a major aria or show tune because he wanted to, and he started to discern what would bring him satisfaction with the progress he’d been able to make.

Joshua also began to also understand the relationships among his singing, sinus and throat issues and the merciless way he drove himself through life to accomplish what he wanted and needed to do.

Up until this personal epiphany, the physical releases and different vocal sensations created by our work together couldn’t take root for this reason:

He equated the pressure in his throat with the pressure he needed to keep going with his responsibilities as as father, husband and bread winner. To let go of some habitual muscles responses to create freer singing responses felt, to him, like letting go of what he needed to”have” to push through life.

Personal Ego identifications often shift during voice training based on motor learning change, as opposed to a more band-aid approach of completing a motor task. And this ego change can be threatening to many singers.

Yet he did understand that his singing needed to be easier. We began changing his diet through working with a nutritionist and found a medical practice for his sinus issues that had a holistic approach.  He also found a better ENT for his sinus flair ups and changed some of the chemical cleaners in his home to less toxic alternatives.

Slowly he opened to to the idea allowing regular somatic education with an outside body worker/practitioner. Somatic education is largely guided by a practitioner or voice teacher, such as myself, who has trained her/his high “somatic empathy” to serve others as a precursor, or partner, to functional vocal pedagogy. I am not the only person doing this in lessons and sessions, but it is still a rare combination to find in one voice teacher.

I also got Josh into regular therapeutic massage.  He started working with an integrative health specialist on adrenal fatigue, which effects hormonal balance, which frankly, made all the difference in the world in his ability to make faster vocal progress. Then the somatic experiencing started to make more sense to him as he started to feel different physically.

Josh studied with me regularly–every other week–for over 6 years before the air flow pattern and patterns of muscle dysfunction were transformed to consistent freer singing. But kudos to him for not giving up when most people would have because of family and work, and kudos to me for having the patience of the Biblical Job!

Josh continues to sing as a lay cantor in his synagogue and now enjoys singing musical theater repertoire from the Golden Age standards as well as Disney film musicals like Hercules.

If you teach voice primarily in academic music programs, or even work mostly with children and teenagers, chances are good that you don’t see students like  Josh in your studio. As people age, their belief systems and health patterns become “fixed,” unless they are tenacious about learning to change and grow. And this requires a huge leap of faith–those “fixed” ideas were originally developed to help a person survive in their environment. This is obviously complicated by the number of responsibilities one has, cultural and religious attitudes, personal expectations and mental & physical health.

All we want to do is sing and enjoy our singing! But the ability to do so is very tied to every facet of our being.  Singing is part of living well–everyone needs some movement, some exercise, some beauty and the support of others to connect body to soul, the stuff of a well-lived life!

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Click here to read “Beliefs That Hinder Singing, Part I.”

or “Higher Education Without The Terminal Academic Degree”

 

 

 

 

 

Shut Up and Let the Student Sing, Vocal Master Class #7

This week’s post features a manner of working that is dependent on the student being both musical and a musician. Musical means there is expression in the voice, (phrasing, colors, emotional connection, etc.) regardless of technical and personal issues, and a musician means discerning in what they are able hear with some developed musical skills in place.

Mindy was a 17 year-old soprano who brought the “Pie Jesu” solo from Gabriel Faure’s choral setting of  the Requiem to work on in her private voice lesson. Her church choir director had asked her to sing it during an Easter service and she was very concerned about “breath support.”

She had been studying regularly with me for two years, was very interested in classical music and was smart and sensitive artistically. She preferred to study classical music, but she loved singing in other styles, too.

I decided to not work functionally and somatically in order to veer in another direction.  I suggested that she  listen to some French organ works by the composer/organist Cesar Franck, who lived about the time of Gabriel Faure.  This was during the Romantic period in Western classical music (late 1800’s to early 1900’s.)

Where did that idea come from? (I am open to intuition.)  What did I hope to accomplish? (Read On–)

I grew up as the daughter of a full time church musician organist/choir master (Dad) and singer/voice teacher (Mom.)  Practically every day the “King of Instruments” was part of my environmental soundscape.  I also studied organ in college (while a voice major in the BM program) and spent several summers as a substitute church organist in Pittsburgh, PA. One of my brothers earned both a BM and MM degrees in Organ Performance.

Growing up, we thought it hilarious to call each other names like “Crumhorn” and “Sacbutt,” which are names for organ stops which control tone quality.  Ah‐hem, yes, I know. Very organ geeky…

As a result of my background, I knew that if Mindy could hear the French reed organ pipe sounds that were developed during the Romantic era in Western Europe, played on a good pipe organ, she might be able to follow her own inner compass to execute the long vocal lines of the Faure piece. And by using her ear and musical sense, she could take what she had developed technically and apply it without my “interference.”

French organ builders introduced a type of wind chest that could accommodate high wind pressures, enabling the organ to imitate woodwind instruments like the bassoon, oboe and flute. So between the new mechanical action of the organ and the new woodwind sounds, the organ could produce lovely legato “singing.”

Mindy “got” the connection between Cesar Franck’s “Prelude, Fugue and Variation” for organ and the vocal line of the “Pie Jesu.” She and I were both amazed at what an instant difference it made in her singing.  She automatically and effectively used what she knew to spin the long lines with more freedom and skill.

And I was humbled at how my shutting up enabled the student to learn more!!!!

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