Evidence-Based Vocal Pedagogy and Other Mystifications Part I

I’m developing a 6-month program for singing teachers who have never had the opportunity to develop a hands-on understanding of what “evidence-based” teaching of singing means in the 21st century.

Over almost 39 years of teaching outside academia by choice, I have been able to work privately with many masters-in-pedagogy and performance graduates, in classical, jazz and contemporary genres.

Over the past ten years I have seen a strange trend develop, of voice teachers amassing accreditations by the boat-load, but not understanding what to do with the information they learn. They seem to not understand that the graduate degree or certification process does not mean that they automatically know how to USE what they’ve learned. So the next summer, they go to another pedagogy intensive, hoping to learn what they still do not understand.

When I teach by webinar, or attend a webinar, I am struck with how stressed young teachers are, even with all their opportunities to learn these days. Do they need to learn more INFORMATION? Or is the real blank spot in their ability to take the information they’ve learned and turn it into a creative body of useful teaching? How can they take information that is contradictory and USE it?

While many institutions of higher learning have a rare professor or two that DO teach this process, you have to have made it into their program to have access to the learning, or have access to their writings and other presentations.

And here’s the thing–when you get out of your graduate program, chances are good that you will be working in the trenches–teaching people to sing from all walks of life, all backgrounds, all ages, all levels of ability. And you’ll have to take those one or two years of graduate school and make whatever happened during those years work for everyone. And I can tell you, it won’t necessarily be what you learned. So how do you make it work?

That’s what my program is about. I have started the process for my program to be reviewed by the Center for Evidence-Based Management and I hope for it to eventually become accredited. I am also collaborating with Dr. Patrick L’Espoir Decosta (Australian National University School of Business) and Dr. Denise Rousseau (Carnegie Mellon-Organizational Management and co-author of the book Evidence Based Management) to turn my program into something that can be used in the Voice Department of Australian National University.

In Part II I give you a little quiz on what you might think “evidence-based” means. If you are like me when I first learned this, it’ll be a huge eye-opener!

Practice while Standing on One Leg

Ian Anderson, lead singer of Jethro Tull

Did you know you can improve your rhythm AND your singing….while balancing on one leg?

Wha?????

To find out some of WHYS and HOWS, watch my guest appearance on Adam Neely’s fantastic Youtube Channel.

Please pardon the bad haircut. My beloved hairdresser is out on maternity leave and, well, you know…

Menopause and Singing: Shifting the Conversation

As some of you know, I am co-authoring a book with Nancy Bos and Joanne Hayes Bozeman on the topic of women singing through midlife biological changes and menopause.

Research has been pretty fascinating and we are digging into areas not usually associated with The Change. (ooooo, suspense!) Our interviews include 52 female singers during 1) various stages of peri-menopause and menopause, 2) a large variety of genres and musical styles 3) many skill levels and cultural experiences.

We are speaking with colleagues and experts in a wide variety of disciplines and will reference many top-notch resources. We are grateful for those who’ve researched and written about hormonal effects on the female singing voice.

But the REAL experts are the women themselves. Their stories, their solutions, their journeys: sometimes easy and breezing on through, some devastatingly difficult.

Statistics are important but their purpose is not to reveal how individual the mid-life journey is for EACH woman. Data can be used to influence public health policy and obtaining grants for important research. Stories save individuals and pass on wisdom not found in data.

Both are needed!

Western medical science & academic learning must become equal partners with honed intuition, and listening to the Wisdom of the Body to create health, wellness and experience singing in new ways.

This is an “angle” of our book. We are writing for singers and teachers who may not have access to the information that has been gathered over the past 30 years. We are also writing for women who are willing to do the work of rebirthing themselves during these years and need extra support.

I’ll report on our progress so join me here for peeks and perks!

Index of my previous articles

Vocal Warm Ups to Enchant Your Singing

I was inspired to write this blog post by Nikki Loney, a Canadian vocal music educator who runs a popular vocal music education podcast called The Full Voice. She has a three-part series called “Warm Ups from Around the World.”

The warm-ups Nikki includes are suitable for many ages and stages of singers. Part of her mission is to help singers & teachers understand the reasons for the vocal exercises they use, and sing them in a spirit of fun and exploration. While the exercises may be familiar to more experienced teachers, I was thrilled to hear the guest artist/teachers’ explanations for WHY you are using them and HOW to do them.

This matters much more than the actual exercises themselves! So consider heading over to her series and listen.

In the meantime, here’s three vocal warm-ups from CateFNStudios that I use.

I.  Pick a short musical phrase from the music that your student or group is singing. Choose one that can be moved up and down the chromatic scale easily. Limit them one or two measures at the most.

Here’s an example for developing voices of any age or stage: a passage from the end of Linda Ronstadt’s recording of Ray Orbison’s “Blue Bayou.”

Use “Blue—Bay—-Ou—-“

Works for women and men. Roy Orbison recorded it first, but he ends on the upper tonic, not the displaced third. If you aren’t sure what that means, listen to them both. You’ll hear the difference without needing to know the theory.

This helps coordinate chest to head registration smoothly in all styles of music, perhaps after registration work has taken root. It easily syncs with most functional vocal pedagogy models out there that use other names for those registrations/qualities.

It can also help with teaching relationships between intervals and with coordinating sustained singing. You can also use it as a “Messa di Voce” exercise.

Plus you get to introduce young people to Ronstadt and Orbison if they look at you with a blank stare….

For choristers, any pattern that has slow, sustained passages has the benefit of the kind of choral tuning that American choral conductor Robert Shaw used. Church choir directors can’t usually take the time needed for this way of working, but it can be incorporated into 2 minutes with one short passage as part of your choir’s warm-up. Over time this will develop stamina, mental focus, and group bonding.

II. For vocal flexibility and ear training for world music, Indie artists or jazz singers–have them warm up on arpeggiated patterns that are not the traditional major scale 1-3-5-8-5-3-1 pattern.

Eventually move to other arpeggiated blues or harmonic patterns using syllables they choose. Try to guide them to “ahs and ays” on the lower notes and “ees, oos or ohs” on the higher pitches. Scat singers will use their patterns or you can suggest something like “doo-bway-doo,” etc.

PS. I make classical singers do this, too, to wake up their ears.

I recognize that not all singers and teachers can play this warm up in different keys on a keyboard. You can adapt this idea for you and your students in any way that serves them.

III. This general idea is for singers who know their music well and are far enough along that it makes sense to them:

I coached privately many years ago with the late Randolph Maulden, of The Washington Opera. Obviously I warmed up before coachings, but then he often had me sing phrases from whatever I was working on, starting 4 1/2 steps down from its key, and going up two more 1/2 steps beyond the highest note and back down. I experienced this as a real work out. This gave me a chance to move through all the registration minutia, and solidified where high notes in the right key actually existed in my throat, body and psyche (as a whole singer.) This idea also can be adapted, so open to your creativity!

Once you know the HOW and the WHY for a warm-up or exercise, you can always adapt it to be the most useful!

Please like, comment or share to let me know this post was helpful to you!

Growing Your Growth Mindset!

Two Awesome Resources to help you understand, and then ‘grow,’ your Growth Mindset!

Growth Mindset for Creatives with Petra Raspel, Interviewed by Nancy Bos on Bos’ Every Sing Podcast

and

Growth Mindset for Singers with Cate Frazier-Neely, Interviewed by Dr. Dan of Dr. Dan’s Voice Essentials Youtube Channel

Note: To skip to the beginning of my interview go to around 7:00.

Let me know what you got out of listening or viewing! What one or two points really got your attention?

Contemporary Musical Theater Repertoire: Women in Mid to Later Life

There are a large number of ‘mid-to-late life’ female musical theater singers who are singing better than ever as they age. I am sure they work very hard at it. And at the same time, they’ve learned to let go of their younger selves to make room for the warmth, depth and passion the mid to later life years can bring.  Please add your additions to this list in the comments.

If you are a women “of a certain age,” you can sing just about anything if you invest in good arrangements. If an ingenue sings the song in the original musical theater version, you can work with a good arranger or pianist to have something arranged for you that helps to express you today. This does cost money, but then you have an arrangement that is yours to sing in cabaret, auditions and other programs. But we do have a new body of song starting to build up that expresses the many facets and experiences of growing older.

My Most Beautiful Day (Tuck Everlasting)

I haven’t Got a Prayer (Sister Act) Sung by Mother Abbess (starts at about 30′)

Dividing Day and Fable  (Light in the Piazza) sung by Margaret

Close the Door (Anastasia) sung by Dowager Empress

Better Yourself (War Paint) sung by Elizabeth Arden

Now You Know (War Paint) sung by Helena Rubenstein

So Big/So Small (Dear Evan Hanson) sung by Heidi

(Also, listen to Renee Fleming’s latest CD release with an arrangement for her of this song.)

Land of Yesterday (Anastasia)
sung by Countess Lilly

Just One Step (Songs for a New World) sung by Woman 2

Love and Love Alone (The Visit) sung by Claire

Almost and Always Better  (Bridges of Madison County) sung by Francesca

Big, Blonde and Beautiful (Hairspray) sung by Mother Maybelle

Days of Plenty and Here Alone, (Little Women) sung by Marmee (the video quality of these recordings is poor, but it’s the the great Maureen McGovern  singing!


Days and Days (Fun Home) sung by Allison

Another Winter in Summer Town and Will You (Grey Gardens) sung by Edie

And last, but not least, check out the second act songs from the musical John and Jen by Andrew Lippa. Jen has a grown son in the second act.

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Excess Saliva While Singing, Part II: Vocal Master Class #11

Let’s face it, the topic of “saliva and singing” isn’t particularly interesting unless you are a singer who finds yourself needing to swallow after every other word. Or you need to completely stop singing to allow saliva time to move down the esophagus.

Chronic excess saliva while singing can suck the joy out of making music. It makes you feel unreliable and is both anxiety and frustration-producing as well. Which just makes the problem worse. And then you feel worse because you KNOW this.

I’d never thought much about this issue in my 38 years of working with singers and singing teachers. Then, last month, three clients turned up IN THE SAME WEEK, who were dealing with excess saliva and singing. One singer’s issue was solved within one session, but I had to do my research because it was new to me.

I then had to fit that research into my overlying pedagogic principles and the use of personal creativity in the studio. (Read Vocal Pedagogy and Creativity, Parts, I and II, starting HERE.)

Reason #2: Excess Saliva and Singing can be caused by certain mouthwashes, toothpastes and teeth whitening products.

Celia, Singer #2, is in her late 30’s, a professional chorister with a BA in piano. She developed the excess saliva about a year ago. When she came for her first session, as we were speaking I noted that her mouth smelled minty. As it turned out, I had just spoken with my dentist about excess saliva and certain mouthwashes, which sometimes contains saliva-inducing ingredients that are normally used to help people with dry mouth. Obviously, vocal fold health depends upon being hydrated.  I asked Celia about her dental regime and she told me that she regularly uses a mouthwash and fluoride gel-cams.

Da-Ding! I suggested she do her own research on the products she used and discovered that they did contain flavoring agents that are often saliva-inducing. These can include sweeteners such as sorbitol, sucralose, sodium saccharin, and xylitol, all of which stimulate salivary function. Three days after discontinuing use of these products, she noticed much less excess saliva while she sang. We had one more session and she seemed to be happy with her progress and ready to return to her voice teacher.

Jan Potter Reed, a wonderful SLP and Singing Voice Specialist at The Chicago Institute for Voice, suggested elderberry lozenges as a possible remedy for excess saliva, but added that singers have to be in touch with whether or not they dry out the mouth too much and create other issues by drying out the vocal folds.

NOTE: Another cause of excessive swallowing during singing is acid reflux.  Each singer with this condition needs a different management plan and kinds of support.

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